Friday, 18 August 2017

A #Cartoon & #ComicBook Tour Of #London No.18: #Greenwich, Metroland @juliascheele & @OrbitalComics

Daily Constitutional Editor Adam writes…

Every year at this busy time I dig into the archives of The Daily Constitutional and repost a few favourites - it allows me to enjoy the school holidays with my daughter and still lead my London Walks tours.

This year I'm reposting my Cartoon & Comic Book Tour of London - a series of posts tracing the inky footsteps left behind in our capital by everyone from William Hogarth to Scooby Doo. It's been one of the most popular series of all on The Daily Constitutional and I'm looking forward to updating it after the holidays with posts on Captain America, the X-Men, George Cruikshank and Mary Darly. In the meantime, here's the story so far…




Panel 18: Metroland & Velvet

In Panel 6 I blogged about Orbital Comics on this Cartoon & Comic Book Tour of London.

Orbital is my regular Wednesday haunt and the guys have kindly added a couple of recommendations to our tour.

Their first was The Wicked + the Divine (Panel 10) and here are two more beginning with the glorious Metroland…



Camilla at Orbital made this a personal recommendation – an indie comic set in London, Metroland is described by the publisher as "a soap opera of music and time travel".

A perfect description, this: what great band story isn't a soap opera? And in a field such a pop, which is constantly drawing on its own past, time travel is not only a perfect metaphor for the modern music business, but also a fun device to create a world where Kurt Cobain and John Lennon are still among us. Smart and fun – everybody strives to be that. Metroland gets there without breaking a sweat.

Created by Ricky Miller (words) and Julia Scheele (art), the series is currently on issue 2 (Note Aug 2017, now issue 3. Ed.) and is peppered with great London locations, not least the view from Greenwich (with a lovely literary allusion in the speech bubble, Du Maurier fans!)…




(The line is an echo of the famous opener of Daphne Du Maurier's Rebecca – "Last night I dreamt I went to Manderley again…" We discussed Daphne Du Maurier's grandfather, George Du Maurier, and his contribution to the world of cartoons way back in Panel 2.)


The indie band in our tale – Electric Dreams – live in a small castle in Greenwich…



The "small castle" in question is in fact Vanbrugh Castle, designed by architect and dramatist John Vanbrugh (1664 – 1726). I can almost feel the moment when inspiration struck Ms Scheele (or, indeed, Mr Miller), beholding the almost-Gothic, mediaeval-inspired pile at Maze Hill and thinking, "THAT would make a fine hideout in a comic book!"

Westminster is also featured, alongside City and Docklands locations, but my personal favourite panel of all is in Issue 2 wherein Kathy loses her job and trudges across London Bridge




… travelling the "wrong" way, i.e. away from conformity, away from the 9 to 5. We can see the crowds thronged in the background, part of the more-than-quarter-million-strong workforce of the City, all heading north. Crossing southward over London Bridge is one of my favourite London journeys and it is captured beautifully here. 

Metroland is my new favourite comic.


Metroland is Published by Avery Hill and you can buy the first three issues from the Avery Hill website averyhillpublishing.bigcartel.com/

Julia Scheele's website, featuring originals for sale and details of how to commission her work, is here: www.juliascheele.co.uk

Here's how to find Vanbrugh Castle…




A London bridge also features in issue no.1 of Orbital's third and final recommendation, Velvet by Brubaker & Epting…




… a cold-war thriller bursting with 60's-inspired gadgets, guns and gear. 




(Is that Battersea Bridge? Looks like it – if you can correct me, drop me a line.)



The guys at Orbital say: "Focusing on the British intelligence agency in the 1960s, Velvet is the story of the quiet secretary whose mysterious past as top field agent comes to light as she is framed by her superiors and is forced to go on the run."

Velvet is published by Image Comics imagecomics.com


Thanks to all at Orbital for the recommendations! 





Tomorrow… From Hell


A London Walk costs £10 – £8 concession. To join a London Walk, simply meet your guide at the designated tube station at the appointed time. Details of all London Walks can be found at www.walks.com.



Thursday, 17 August 2017

The #London Nightly #Photoblog 17:08:17 Lost City Of Atlantis Found!

The London Nightly Photoblog August 2017 brings together 31 London signs – street signs, instructions, bylaws, adverts and slogans. Some are official, others not-so-much. Some are intriguing, some ornate, some enigmatic and others are just plain daft. 


Every night throughout August they'll give us one last look at London before bedtime. I hope you enjoy them and we look forward to seeing you on a London Walks tour tomorrow. 











A London Walk costs £10 – £8 concession. To join a London Walk, simply meet your guide at the designated tube station at the appointed time. Details of all London Walks can be found at www.walks.com.



Wednesday, 16 August 2017

The #London Nightly #Photoblog 16:08:17 #AbbeyRoad #CarefulNow

The London Nightly Photoblog August 2017 brings together 31 London signs – street signs, instructions, bylaws, adverts and slogans. Some are official, others not-so-much. Some are intriguing, some ornate, some enigmatic and others are just plain daft. 


Every night throughout August they'll give us one last look at London before bedtime. I hope you enjoy them and we look forward to seeing you on a London Walks tour tomorrow. 



Where else? At the famous Abbey Road crosswalk. It's good advice!








A London Walk costs £10 – £8 concession. To join a London Walk, simply meet your guide at the designated tube station at the appointed time. Details of all London Walks can be found at www.walks.com.



A #Cartoon & #ComicBook Tour Of #London No.16: Fleet Street @DC_Thomson @BeanoComic @PrivateEyeNews

Daily Constitutional Editor Adam writes…

Every year at this busy time I dig into the archives of The Daily Constitutional and repost a few favourites - it allows me to enjoy the school holidays with my daughter and still lead my London Walks tours.

This year I'm reposting my Cartoon & Comic Book Tour of London - a series of posts tracing the inky footsteps left behind in our capital by everyone from William Hogarth to Scooby Doo. It's been one of the most popular series of all on The Daily Constitutional and I'm looking forward to updating it after the holidays with posts on Captain America, the X-Men, George Cruikshank and Mary Darly. In the meantime, here's the story so far…






Panel No.16: Fleet Street


I daren't leave Fleet Street out of my Cartoon and Comic Book Tour of London – even though the national newspaper industry has long since abandoned its spiritual home.

Fleet Street as a metonym, however, is still going strong. And it doesn’t seem to want to go away. Twenty-first century TV and radio presenters still refer to the British press collectively as Fleet Street. To put this in perspective, The Daily Mail, one of the UK’s most popular papers, set up shop in Kensington as long ago as 1988. Yet Fleet Street as a moniker persists.

The nationals may have moved on, but any paper worth its salt still has a cartoonist – even though it was reported in UK Press Gazette (This blog was first posted Feb 2015: Ed.) that The Daily Express was keen to dispense with the services of their political cartoonist, news that broke back in January on the same day as the Charlie Hebdo murders.

The Express once had a phalanx of daily cartoons the envy of Fleet Street. Their strips included Rupert Bear and James Bond, and their political cartoonist was the famous Giles. No English home was complete without a copy of the Giles annual. 



Giles was a Londoner by birth, born Ronald Giles in Islington in 1916. His topical cartoons often featured the family that became his signature, headed by the doughty (and I always thought faintly sinister) Grandma. His collections are still published annually, some 20 years after his death, and can be bought in the bookshop at the Cartoon Museum.

The Daily Express is also the only British paper to publish a cartoon on its front page almost everyday since 1929 in the shape of the Crusader…






The crusader was the brainchild of legendary newspaper baron Lord Beaverbrook. Beaverbrook bought the Express in 1916 back when he was plain old Mr. Max Aitken.

The crusader was the emblem of his campaign for free trade between nations of the empire – an initiative he hoped would benefit his native Canada. In 1951 when Churchill was elected as Prime Minister, he disappointed Beaverbrook with his abandonment of traditional imperial policies. In reaction, The Beaver slapped chains on the Crusader – a gesture that was repeated when Britain was invited to join the Common Market (a forerunner of the European Community).

The Crusader remains the emblem of The Daily Express to this day.


A version of the Crusader, rather more battered and forlorn, represents our great satirical magazine Private Eye





(I blogged about Private Eye earlier in this series, see Panel 3).


It would be inaccurate to say that rumours of Fleet Street's death have been greatly exaggerated – no national newspapers are left here, and Reuters moved away in 2003. And since the journalists left, other despised and unpopular professions have since moved in with the arrival of the bankers and the lawyers. (How's that for an unholy trinity?) But there is one famous name left standing in the once infamous Street of Ink: D.C Thomson.

D.C Thomson is the publisher of the Dundee Courier, the People's Friend story paper and the famous Sunday Post. The titles are built into the fabric of its Fleet Street HQ…





The Sunday Post is published weekly in Dundee and features the legendary cartoon strips The Broons and Oor Wullie, originally drawn by the Lancashire-born artist Dudley D. Watkins – whose work can be seen at the Cartoon Museum in Bloomsbury (see panel 11 in this series).

Oor Wullie is Scotland's answer to Dennis the Menace…




…,while The Broons features a cartoon family that holds as dear a place in the hearts of Scots as Giles's family occupy in the affections of middle England…



(I have a theory about Wullie's hair: given that the creators and writers of The Simpsons plough such a rich furrow of Scottish wit with their Groundskeeper Willie character, even referencing Baron Ross of Marnock, the former Willie Ross MP in one gag – pretty nuanced stuff! – I'm prepared to stick my neck out and claim that Oor Wullie is the inspiration for Bart Simpson…)


Wullie & Bart. Separated at birth?



You can buy Broons & Oor Wullie books and merchandise direct from D.C Thomson here: www.dcthomsonshop.co.uk


The Broons strip was famously parodied as The Broonites written by Fountain & Jamieson for Private Eye magazine, to poke fun at our former Prime Minister Gordon Brown.





The artwork is by the excellent Henry Davies, who works for The Beano and has also drawn for the official Broons! (He shares great cartoon related stuff via his Twitter feed @BeanoArtist and you can buy his originals direct from his website.)



You can subscribe to Private Eye magazine at privateeye.subscribeonline.co.uk


As a child growing up in Scotland it was always a race to get to the copy of The Sunday Post before my father. If my father got there first he would pore over the comics for what seemed like AGES, chuckling away while I stood jealously by.


Oor Wullie and The Broons have appeared in The Sunday Post since 1936 and it is claimed that Watkins, along with David Low, was listed as an enemy of the Third Reich for his satirical portraits of the Nazi leadership – see our earlier post for more on that topic.

Mr. Watkins was also the creator of Desperate Dan for The Dandy (here's Dan on a first class stamp)…




… and worked for the legendary Beano – again, the last man standing of the classic British comics, and a periodical of which I remain an avid reader…






When the D.C Thomson offices closed last year (2014) for a makeover, they chose neither the Sunday Post nor the Evening Telegraph to brighten up their windows, but pages from The Beano…





Here's a map to Fleet Street and D.C Thomson's HQ…



Footnote… I be call by D.C Thomson on my Publish & Be Damned walking tour, which looks at the history of journalism in Fleet Street. I'll often bring my Broons and Oor Wullie annuals along for you to look at at… as long as you promise not to hog them for as long as my dad.



Tomorrow… Gosh! Comics in Soho


A London Walk costs £10 – £8 concession. To join a London Walk, simply meet your guide at the designated tube station at the appointed time. Details of all London Walks can be found at www.walks.com.